Cape May Lighthouse: Day Trip to New Jersey

Cape May Lighthouse, Cape May Lighthouse: Day Trip to New Jersey, The Travel Bug Bite

The Cape May Lighthouse is the third documented lighthouse at the southern tip of New Jersey. It has been an aid-to-navigation for mariners and attraction for visitors since it was built in 1859! More than 2.5 million visitors have climbed the lighthouse since it opened to the public in 1988. For those who choose not to climb, the Oil House on the grounds contains a fully accessible Visitors’ Orientation Center and Museum Shop carrying souvenirs, books and maritime items. The state park offers many amenities for nature lovers and family fun.

I am a huge lighthouse nerd, and I demanded to see one on our day trip to Cape May. Now we did not drive all the way down from Rhode Island to New Jersey for just a day. We actually did this trip back when we lived in New York and this showed up in my memories last week. Even though I made a video for my YouTube channel, I never ended up writing about it!

The Lighthouse Keeper

“Saturday mornings at 8:15 a.m., this slender dark haired woman, moving with a dancer’s grace, ascends the 199 steps to the look-out at the Cape May Lighthouse. This is her ritual, no matter the sea-swept winds, rain and fog that sometimes shroud the red cap atop the cream tower that is Cape Island’s most visible landmark. On a clear day she can see 20 miles in all directions. This July morning the sun splashes millions of diamonds on the sapphire sea. The light salty breezes rustle her log book as she writes.

She pauses, touches the rail, and circles the observation deck, absorbing the 360-degree view from 136 feet high. She scans the horizon for oil tankers, fishing boats, sloops, schooners and ferries. “Flounder must be running,” she says to herself, observing a village of vessels.”

Cape May

You can read more about the history of the lighthouse and it’s keeper here.

Our Visit to Cape May Lighthouse

As I already mentioned, Cape May Lighthouse is over 150 years old! From the top, you can enjoy great views of the nearby beaches. It is perfectly located at the southernmost tip of the state, ehich makes a lot of sense since the purpose of a lighthouse is to keep sailors safe. As you can see from the drone video, there are also lots of houses in the area and yes, I am incredibly jealous!

Unfortunately, we droned first and asked later, finding out that droning here isn’t allowed because it disturbs the wildlife. We won’t be making that mistake again, and we recommend that you always ask before flying your drones. It is super exciting and we all forget sometimes that drones can be noisy and dangerous.

Cape May Lighthouse, Cape May Lighthouse: Day Trip to New Jersey, The Travel Bug Bite

Admission Cost

Veterans and active members of the military can climb the amazing Cape May Lighthouse for free, as they very well deserve. For children, the price is $5 and an adult ticket is $10. They also have various events such as a moonlight climb, scheduled for October 1st for $15. I wished I lived closer because that sounds absolutely amazing with a hint of spooky! You can find out more about their events here.

Cape May Lighthouse, Cape May Lighthouse: Day Trip to New Jersey, The Travel Bug Bite

Summary: Cape May Lighthouse

Lighthouses are fun to explore because of their history and amazing views. Every single one is unique, just like a snowflake. And just like the first snow, we can’t help but get excited when we see a lighthouse, no matter how many we have seen. Cape May Lighthouse is a great place to visit for families, individuals and couples – it can be quite the romantic trip if you’re looking for a unique date idea. I hope to return and climb up this time, since I didn’t get to last time I visited and deeply regret it.

Follow The Travel Bug Bite for more great content and fun day trip ideas!

Cape May Lighthouse, Cape May Lighthouse: Day Trip to New Jersey, The Travel Bug Bite

Cape May Lighthouse, Cape May Lighthouse: Day Trip to New Jersey, The Travel Bug Bite

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.